Instaurer une société entrepreneuriale et créatrice

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Innovation with Robotics

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 17 août 2016 1471465700
Mots clés:
FIRST Robotics Canada (a non-profit organization) is also currently working diligently and tirelessly to support and prepare the next generation to be .... Lire la suite

FIRST Robotics Canada (a non-profit organization) is also currently working diligently and tirelessly to support and prepare the next generation to be innovators and thought-leaders of the future. Through FIRST programs and initiatives, students are becoming more skilled and prepared to face the challenges of the future. With a stronger connection and increased support, FIRST could play an even greater role in preparing the next generation to make Canada great.

“Canada needs a bold, coordinated strategy on innovation that delivers results for all Canadians. We need to move forward with fresh ideas and a joint action plan that will make innovation a national priority and put Canada on a firm path to long-term economic growth.” –The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

We at FIRST whole-heartedly agree with Minister Bains approach to innovation. We currently see a talent pool of kids and students who, if given the opportunity and know-how, will inherently approach problem solving with an innovative approach. Currently, youth are not widely given that opportunity which results in a lack of a prepared and innovative leaders and workforce.

This is where FIRST Robotics Canada programs make a difference. FIRST programs teach kids and youth the necessary skills and strategy that inspire fresh ideas, innovation, and creative problem solving. If more students are exposed to, and participate in, FIRST programs, they will cultivate the skills and habits for the future that lead to unlimited potential and opportunities. These are the leaders who will help put Canada on the firm path to economic growth and sustainability.

With increased support for FIRST programs, the benefits include:

  • More student participation in FIRST programs, resulting in more students prepared for a future where creative problem solving is critical
  • Cultivating a future workforce of leaders who believe in teamwork, encourage diversity, and inspire creativity 
  • Developing and teaching students the skills and know-how to embrace challenges with an innovative mindset
  • Showcasing and proving that we’re surrounded by talent who will have the competencies to compete in a digital world, lead global partnerships and change, encourage entrepreneurship, and accelerate growth in Canadian business
  • Increased collaboration between organizations and corporations involved in FIRST and kids and youth across Canada

This kind of program truly makes a difference in cultivating the leaders and innovators of the future.

Mentions de sources: FIRST Robotics Canada

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Fab Labs Nation

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 11 juillet 2016 1468243720
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Le français suit. The “Fab Labs Nation” project proposes a concerted strategy to equip Canada with a digital manufacturing interstructur .... Lire la suite

Le français suit.

The “Fab Labs Nation” project proposes a concerted strategy to equip Canada with a digital manufacturing interstructure that makes it possible to promote, entrepreneurship and the creation of jobs of the future as well as innovation in communities and businesses.

A Fab Lab is a collaborative innovation laboratory equipped with digital production machine tools (3D printers, laser cutters, digital milling machines, etc.) and an innovation accelerator where students, engineers, inventors, creators and all those who have a project gather to go from the idea to the object. The Fab Lab offers its users the means necessary for professional digital design to conduct collaborative innovation projects, access to quick prototyping.

A true international community gravitates around the Fab Labs, by implementing laboratories in hundreds of cities and villages. The potential which emanates from them for economic and social development steadily increases and is explored in numerous sectors: health, creativity, education, entrepreneurship, etc. The Fab Labs are part of an open innovation movement and are the tangible tools of a Smart City.

 

L'initiative « Fab Labs Nation » propose une stratégie concertée pour doter le Canada d’une interstructure de fabrication numérique permettant de favoriser l'entrepreneuriat et la création d'emplois d'avenir, l'innovation dans les communautés et les entreprises.

Un Fab Lab est un laboratoire d’innovation collaborative équipé de machines-outils de fabrication numérique (imprimante 3D, découpe laser, fraiseuse numérique, etc.) et un accélérateur d'innovation où les étudiants, les ingénieurs, les inventeurs, les créateurs et tous ceux qui ont un projet entrepreneurial se réunissent pour passer de l’idée à l’objet. Le Fab Lab offre à ses usagers les moyens de conception numérique professionnel nécessaires pour mener des projets d’innovation collaboratifs, l'accès au prototypage rapide.

Une véritable communauté internationale gravite autour des Fab Labs, par l'implantation de laboratoires dans des centaines de villes et villages. Le potentiel qui en découle pour le développement économique et social croit sans cesse et est exploré dans de multiples secteurs : santé, créativité, éducation, entrepreneurship, etc.. Les Fab Labs font partie du mouvement d'innovation ouverte (open innovation) et sont les outils concrets d'une Ville intelligente (Smart City).

 Source : http://www.communautique.quebec/portfolio-items/fablabs-nation/?portfolioID=33

 

 

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Developing an inclusive Canadian innovation accessibility digital communication strategy

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 22 juin 2016 1466617675
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The digital economy is driving economic prosperity through increased productivity and market growth,, but the ability to use new emerging technologies .... Lire la suite

The digital economy is driving economic prosperity through increased productivity and market growth,, but the ability to use new emerging technologies is currently at the heart of social inclusion, with those excluded being left out of many work, entertainment, communication, healthcare and social benefits. About 15% of the world's population live with a disability, and the prevalence of disability is growing due to population ageing and the global increase in chronic health conditions.In 2005, Ontario became the first jurisdiction in Canada, and a world leader in implementing proactive, enforceable, compliance-based accessibility legislation. The standards requireOntario organizations to identify, remove and prevent barriers for people with disabilities in key areas of daily living. Fundamentally, accessibilityis about expanding market opportunities to achieve sustainable growth in revenue, return on investment, and profitability; And not just about legal compliance. Due to the life challenges, people with disabilities tend to be creative thinkers and problem solvers in innovation technologies. Many of the mainstream technologies we enjoy today were initiated by research and development in resolving a disability challenge.Unfortunately, much of the digital communication systems being implement throughout Canadian organizations is inaccessible to blind and deaf Canadians. This is revealed in statistics that show more than 80% of Canadians with vision loss are unemployed, and about 25% live below the poverty line. To reverse this trend we need greater participation of skilled blind professionals in the decision making process of government strategies that will build a more prosperous Canada. Currently Canadian digital communication strategies present barriers in the participation of Canadians with disabilities.We need an integrated accessibility growth strategy that link the Ministries of Innovation, Employment, Infrastructure, and Persons With Disabilities. We need competent and well informed leaders, who understand the impact of digital communications on the quality of life for all Canadians. We need a prosperity strategy that maximizes the skills of disabled Canadians, and promotes greater inclusion. We need to enable Canadian innovators by stimulating creativity, and enable disabled Canadians by getting smart technologies into their hands as soon as possible.

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Challenge Canadians by Issuing Challenges

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 22 juin 2016 1466610701
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Many of today's social "challenges" have a department, agency, or other organization devoted solely to tackling the issue. This has had a limited trac .... Lire la suite

Many of today's social "challenges" have a department, agency, or other organization devoted solely to tackling the issue. This has had a limited track record of success due to a number of reasons, including myopic thinking, only having the "usual suspects" of stakeholders at the table, and large and slow moving bureaucracies.

My proposal is to harness the collective brainpower of all Canadians to help solve some of these social challenges through the issuance of Grand Challenges similiar to the challenges issued by the U.S. Government's Challenge.gov website. By having a Government of Canada website that publishes a list of challenges: i.e. how to solve homelessness for veterans, how to increase affordable housing, how to issue microloans to Canadians, how to increase the birth rate in Canada, etc... and asking Canadians to submit solutions to them is a low-cost and innovative way to reach a much broader audience who may not even know about some of the social challenges in Canada. 

Benefits of having a Grand Challenges website:

- Government and/or non-government organizations may submit challenges to the general public

- Can have sponsors (The Alzheimer's society may sponsor a challenge that tries to develop new innovative ways to reverse dementia) for some of the challenges and could potentially offer prizes (monetary, recognition, contract) 

- The first step in solving a problem is identifying the problem. Not all Canadians are aware of the pressing social challenges of the day. Having a central website will allow more innovative ideas to germinate as Canadians with different perspectives have an opportunity to share their knowledge.  

- Once you have a list of plausible solutions to a challenge, then publish these potential solutions and have Canadians comment on them, add to them, in an iterative process etc...Think of it like a "Wikipedia of Ideas" where the best solutions are based on a foundation of previous ideas.   

The new solutions that will be developed will ultimately benefit all Canadians. Challenges stimulate markets and create industries, build communities of citizen scientists and change people’s lives.

 

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More Worker Cooperatives

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 23 juin 2016 1466699574
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Worker Cooperatives are democratically-run enterprises which have been proven through many studies to be more sustainable than traditional, capitalist .... Lire la suite

Worker Cooperatives are democratically-run enterprises which have been proven through many studies to be more sustainable than traditional, capitalist-owner enterprises.

Because the people who own the business are those that work in the business, they have several advantages to capitalist, top-down enterprises:

  • More likely to keep work in the community where the business is based (and not offshore jobs), as the owners have a direct interest in the community (as they live there)
  • A fair and equitable distribution of profit, therefore enriching local communities instead of shareholders
  • As every worker is also an owner, this brings true democracy and democratic values to the workplace, where adults spend most of their lives.

Cooperatives should be the new standard in business organization. Let's have Canada lead the way!

 

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Create a supportive environment for Social Enterprise

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 16 juillet 2016 1468695066
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Social Enterprises, community based non-profit businesses that prioritize social impact, require a supportive environment in order to develop, grow, a .... Lire la suite

Social Enterprises, community based non-profit businesses that prioritize social impact, require a supportive environment in order to develop, grow, and scale.

  • Gov of Canada should insure that all SME business services are available to non-profit operated businesses - where already allowed then the appropriate services made available; where denied services then regulatory fix is required
  • Social value considerations and impact should be required element of all government purchasing and infrastructure investments
  • Appropriate financing opportunities and impact investment options need to be supported
  • Establish a supportive regulatory environment for non-profit enterprise activities - including clarifying charity based enterprise activity and non-profit revenue generation

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Opening public service employment

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 12 juillet 2016 1468334981
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As a public servant for the past 25+ years, I have witnessed or participated in running several competitions to hire new staff. My observations in the .... Lire la suite

As a public servant for the past 25+ years, I have witnessed or participated in running several competitions to hire new staff. My observations in the context of attracting and developing talent are as follows:

  • it has become the habit of most managers and HR departments I've seen, when faced with hiring staff, to restrict hiring to the simplest and least time-consuming route possible, given the complexities and lost time associated with this convoluted and lengthy process. What this usually means is that the PS almost never gains new talent. We just shuffle it around from job to job, because the internal processes of deployments and assignments, etc., is so much easier than a country-wide advertised open process that might attract thousands of applicants to sort through... This is a disservice to the countless extremely bright and motivated young people who could add so much in terms of innovation and fresh ideas to our public service. So I would recommend an overhaul of the hiring system to facilitate bringing outside people in for the normal run-of-the-mill competitions so we are not stagnating.
  • Secondly, I have seen that the strictly structured method of interviewing with defined sets of standardized questions, while intended to reduce subjectivity, does not permit the flexibility needed for managers to hire good people, quickly. It is not uncommon for a competitive process to take 7-10 months to complete. And if you find anyone good, they are gone by the time an offer is made because that step alone requires a month or two because of all the rules. I would recommend a system in which broad overarching principles are set out, and within that big "circle", managers have lots of flexibility and discretion to hire good people, knowing they must be able to justify it. Too-tight rules makes for a cumbersome, inefficient, unattractive process that accomplishes little. People need to be given the respect and trust that they can do a good job hiring good people. I have an example from our office where a casual employee who performed a job superbly for 15 years intermittently has never been able to be hired - even though we wanted her and she wanted us. That is good talent wasted. Youth need an open public service where they can compete easily for jobs so the PS has a dynamic work force - and managers need to be able to hire the best candidate, not the easiest one to move into a position, with flexibility and speed.

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Modernize Regulations for Charities and Non-Profits Operating Businesses

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 24 août 2016 1472057846
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Provide a supportive regulatory framework giving charities and non-profits more flexibility to pursue business models that generate both social and fi .... Lire la suite

Provide a supportive regulatory framework giving charities and non-profits more flexibility to pursue business models that generate both social and financial impacts. This should involve clarifying and updating Canada Revenue Agency guidance, and redesigning the Income Tax regime and other regulatory issues.

Mentions de sources: Canadian CED Network, Social Enterprise Council of Canada, Chantier de l'économie sociale

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Inclusive Innovation

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 23 juin 2016 1466702591
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To become a leader in social entrepreneurship, Canada needs to bridge the gap between social and economic impact. We need to ensure the innovative bre .... Lire la suite

To become a leader in social entrepreneurship, Canada needs to bridge the gap between social and economic impact. We need to ensure the innovative breakthroughs in science and technology also benefit the marginalized and the poor. 

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National youth STEM and innovation development system - like hockey

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 02 juillet 2016 1467490212
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Studies over the past 15 years have shown that about two-thirds of Canadian kids ages 12-18 think STEM is important, interesting, and fun. Canadian st .... Lire la suite

Studies over the past 15 years have shown that about two-thirds of Canadian kids ages 12-18 think STEM is important, interesting, and fun. Canadian students rank in the top 10 of 65 OECD countries on international tests of science achievement. Our kids like, and are good at STEM.

Yet, despite this potential, only about 30% of Canadian high school students take STEM courses after grade 10, limiting their access to opportunities in STEM-related fields. No surprise that in 2014 the Canadian Council of Academies (CCA) reported that Canada’s total employment in STEM occupations was just 30% – 22nd out of 37 countries. Do our kids just lose interest in high school? Perhaps, but then how do we explain that 93% of Canadian adults are very or moderately interested in new scientific discoveries and technological developments (1st out of 33 countries), or that 32% visited a science centre/museum in the previous year (2nd out of 39 countries) – according to the same CCA report.

We’re good at getting Canadian kids interested in STEM. Over 100 organizations and institutions, from local to national, offer school presentations, workshops, camps, experiences, challenges, and competitions. They reach a huge number of students, but the percentage of high school students taking STEM courses has remained stubbornly around 30% for years. Canada has no lack of STEM promotion programs – we lack a national strategy and coordination.

PromoScience, through NSERC, provides federal funding for many of these programs – $4.8M over 3 years to 43 organizations in 2015. Grants are awarded through a peer-review process; however, there’s no analysis for redundancy, imbalances, and gaps – or even a program inventory to analyze. As a result, there’s no strategy underlying this funding, or benchmarks to measure progress; the best-written proposals get funded.

Canada produces great hockey players – and now Olympic athletes – because we have a development system. It starts by getting lots of young kids participating for fun. From there, those with ability and passion (and/or ‘enthusiastic’ parents) progress through a series of levels that build skills and identify top prospects. Canada has lots of Timbits-type STEM programs, but no system to guide those kids or parents when they ask, “What’s next?”

I propose that Canada build on its excellent STEM promotion capacity to establish a national youth STEM and innovation development system, similar to those for sports, to cultivate not only interest and excitement, but engagement, skills, and excellence. A national youth STEM and innovation advisory panel – leaders from the national youth STEM and innovation organizations; representatives of regional, provincial, and local organizations; and young Canadians – should be appointed to guide the process. They would start by building a national inventory of programs and then analyze to identify systemic strengths and weaknesses, recommend targets, and evaluate progress.

If we’re serious about developing youth with skills for the future economy, let’s get Canada’s youth STEM promotion organizations working together, rather than competing with each other for funding and profile. It works for hockey.

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Ask Experts and Academics, not Entrepeneurs, for Input

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 08 juillet 2016 1468007925
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Entrepreneurs make toys that provide little social benefit and require little creativity in order to generate revenue. Academics, scientist, and other .... Lire la suite

Entrepreneurs make toys that provide little social benefit and require little creativity in order to generate revenue. Academics, scientist, and other specialist create tools upon which those entrepreneurs can build (often, if not always, by using open source mechanisms without providing credit). Indeed, the internet itself was created not by "entrepreneurs," but by academics working in conjunction with public institutions. Do we want a thousand companies trying to be the next Facebook or do we want a thousand research projects building quantum computers?

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Innovation vs. Entrepreneurship

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 12 juillet 2016 1468327284
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If we want to be a nation of Innovators then I think we need to also talk about the connection and differences between entrepreneurs and innovators.  .... Lire la suite

If we want to be a nation of Innovators then I think we need to also talk about the connection and differences between entrepreneurs and innovators. 

I run a summer intensive entrepreneurship program for youth at Algonquin College called SUMMIT. As I've shared with them, all entrepreneurs are innovators but not all innovators are entrepreneurs. I describe entrepreneurship as a riding a roller coaster wrapped in chaos. You have to be the right kind of person to jump aboard that ride. But not everyone needs to jump on board. The entrepreneurs that start the businesses and are interested in that ride need a talent pool of innovators to hire and inspire them. Although, we need to support entrepreneurs we also need to breed innovators. 

The Conference Board of Canada has outlined a set of Innovation Skills that includes: creativity & problem solving, communication & collaboration, risk assessment and risk taking, and implementation skills. I think these are the skills that need to be infused in our education system and organizations at all levels.

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National Foundation for Science, Technology and Innovation

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 28 juillet 2016 1469705082
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Canada as a nation requires a workforce that is capable of generating innovative solutions to problems through collaboration, communication, critical .... Lire la suite

Canada as a nation requires a workforce that is capable of generating innovative solutions to problems through collaboration, communication, critical thinking, and creativity. There has been over a decade of research, books, papers, and videos about how the education system does not prepare our youth for the future and there are suggestions for areas of focus, but what we need now is an action-oriented implementation program. The desire for change and the ability to implement a strategy exists.  The most efficient approach to achieve this goal is to tap into the human resources that exist and to use these resources to provide learning experiences that foster essential skills. 

The path to developing the “right skills” rests heavily in Science, Technology and Innovation education.  There is a comprehensive coast-to-coast network of informal learning in Canada through Science Centres and organizations such as Let’s Talk Science, ACTUA, and Youth Science Canada. Independently they do amazing work; collectively, with a strong support system, they could change the country! Currently, no national coordinating body exists for the extensive informal network; a network that is able to come from outside the provincial education systems and act as a vehicle for change inside the systems. Almost all the G7 countries have such a body.

To begin, we need to create a National Foundation for Science, Technology and Innovation that supports in-school and out-of-school informal and innovative learning practices. The foundation can provide a coordinated effort through which a fundamental transformation of Education will occur. The proposed budget for the foundation could be based on the number of school aged children in our schools at a level of $2/child. The investment would be made available to all informal STEM education organizations that reach Canadian youth. Collaboration with each Province would ensure that the program addresses their priority areas. It will be important for the “national coordinating body” to develop clear objectives linked with the development of 21st century skills.

Equipping our youth with the right skills will require a concerted effort by all levels of government, organizations, schools, and individuals. Creating the National Foundation for Science, Technology and Innovation would be a big step in achieving these objectives.

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Use Social Procurement and Community Benefit Agreements for Inclusive Growth

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 24 août 2016 1472057550
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Support enhanced market access for social enterprises and co-operatives by stimulating demand through social procurement policies and community benefi .... Lire la suite

Support enhanced market access for social enterprises and co-operatives by stimulating demand through social procurement policies and community benefit agreements. Initiatives such as Buy Social Canada, L'économie sociale, j'achète, ECPAR and the Toronto Community Benefits Network are leading Canadian examples of this rapidly emerging practice.

Mentions de sources: Canadian CED Network, Buy Social Canada, Chantier de l'économie sociale, Toronto Community Benefits

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Invest in an Enabling National Ecosystem for Social Innovation and Inclusive Growth

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 26 août 2016 1472223467
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Support innovation networks and communities of practice to connect relevant stakeholders across sectors, such as through the Social Enterprise Ecosyst .... Lire la suite

Support innovation networks and communities of practice to connect relevant stakeholders across sectors, such as through the Social Enterprise Ecosystem Canada initiative being led by the Canadian CED Network, the Chantier de l'économie sociale, the Social Enterprise Institute and Buy Social Canada.

Mentions de sources: Canadian CED Network, Chantier de l'économie sociale, Social Enterprise Institute, Buy Social Canada

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Create Core Educational Policies and Build Expert Teams to Create Evidence-Based Educational Technologies, Learning Environments, and The World’s Leading Mobile Education Platform to Assist Teachers and Students Nationally and Worldwide

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 31 août 2016 1472624552
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The learning environments and educational approaches utilized in the majority of classrooms across our country (particularly publicly funded post-seco .... Lire la suite

The learning environments and educational approaches utilized in the majority of classrooms across our country (particularly publicly funded post-secondary institutions) are based on educational practices developed hundreds of years ago before digital technology was available. This creates a situation where a minority of students get access to effective teachers, while the majority must suffer from poorly delivered education based on ineffective educational practices which often ignore basic pedagogy. This is a systemic issue of educational inequality (prevalent throughout our institutions), which I would argue is a fundamental root issue in Canadian society. Since many citizens are largely unaware that this is even an issue, the problem remains unaddressed as other progressive nations jump ahead in this area of innovation. High quality, evidence based education should be a right for all people, and we are not currently progressing towards that goal at the pace that is required within our current national and global situation.

The government has made post-secondary education more affordable and accessible, but there is still no standard of quality and very little application of evidence based educational technology and learning environments. There is plenty of research that has been conducted in key universities that proves the effectiveness of progressive educational approaches (although many universities do not yet have programs offered in the Learning Sciences).

To attract and keep the world’s best talent, Canada needs a clear goal: to become a world leader in digital education technology (particularly evidence based solutions that are scalable) that can assist individual learners as well as blended learning environments, both throughout our country and throughout the world. Canada should aim to create value for the entire world by creating cross-platform applications that will work well across mobile and desktop platforms (likely with the focus being on mobile to benefit the most people). Canada should see evidence based education as a right to all people, and should aim to provide it to all of its citizens as well as people in third world countries. There are many people (in Canada and throughout the world) who don’t have access effective schools or effective teachers, which leads to a lower quality of life.

The best way to support startups and growing companies is to focus on effective 21st century education for all Canadians. That means focusing on areas such as basic computational thinking, problem solving, programming, health education, project-based learning, basic learning sciences education, educational technology development, and harnessing creativity and collaboration by the practice of creating solutions that add measurable value to people’s lives and the environment. This is the basis for creating an entrepreneurial and creative society. If students undergo project-based learning using digital technologies, public-private industry partnerships will naturally emerge, and startups will begin to flourish.

Canada has a strength in ICT technologies, but very few attempts are currently made to retain the talent that we produce. The people who leave Canada to work at top technology companies are usually motivated learners who frequently engage in self-directed learning. If Canada can produce the best educational technologies, these technologies can scale up and target everyone all the way from our children to the top technologists to improve their learning efficiency as they learn new technologies. It is only natural that they will then be interested in being part of this educational movement and want to contribute tools and content to the new educational platforms that are created. Since this goal has the higher purpose of improving the lives of Canadians and people worldwide, people will likely want to participate if it also means becoming global leaders in this emerging market. As more devices and people are added to the internet, having the best mobile education platforms will ensure Canada’s economic viability moving forward in the 21st century.

Creating a demand for research in educational development will spur scientific growth and excellence within our higher educational institutions. There is already good research being done which can be leveraged, but implementing those findings and testing which approaches are the most effective will be a scientific exercise. This will involve taking all the leading innovations and creating a landscape of cooperative competition among educators and technologists as we learn which approaches are the most effective in which situations. If Canada conducts this research and publishes the findings, other countries will begin to look to Canada for the best insights into learning sciences and effective education.

We can also leverage these educational platforms to inform our citizens about the most pressing issues we face as a nation and a species. By teaching all people how to use technology effectively, companies will naturally start to grow. By teaching all people about clean growth and the environment, our startups can have a positive impact on the earth. By teaching all people about local and global issues and creating effective impact, our effort can be directed in the most beneficial way. This provides the perfect foundation for Canada to become a strong competitor in today’s digital world. Delivering distributed educational solutions that really work is the one of the best value propositions that Canada can offer to the rest of the world.

If Canada is successful in creating scalable educational technology that can be easily delivered to other countries, clusters and partnerships will naturally emerge throughout the world. Canada can utilize its progressive political situation to help lift the world out of educational poverty, which is in line with the goals of the UN. Most of the other large issues in the world are arguably symptomatic of the root problem: inaccessible or ineffective education. Mobile technologies can be flexible to work in situations where not many devices are available or there is low internet connectivity. For example, paper materials can be printed based on the curriculum content stored within the platform, which can also be stored locally on devices if there is no connection. Or, the application can enter a mode where only the teacher uses it to guide lessons and manage student learning and progress. This can help fix the teaching gap that exists in counties around the world as it would not require teachers to be fully qualified to deliver material that has been proven to be effective in such situations, such as flipped/mastery/personalized/adaptive learning technologies (and so on). I could dive into the details of effective educational approaches here, but it is hard to summarize years of research and innovation that has happened in the top private institutions around the world in several paragraphs. Of course, I would be happy to provide additional resources and research, as well as several reports I’ve written that contain my own ideas of how to implement such educational platforms and environments.

Creating educational policy that ensures the availability of evidence-based educational technology and learning environments to all people helps Canadians greatly in the short term, but even more so in the long term. If we combine the diversity of skills that Canadians already possess with the ability to create effective technologies, Canada will produce innovations across a large spectrum of sectors. This is likely the ultimate way to stimulate economic development, create jobs and improve the lives of as many people as possible.

It is only a matter of time before coding education becomes mandatory within Canadian schools, or at the very least widely adopted. By investing in innovative educational technologies, Canada will not only be avoiding the pitfalls of the current approaches to coding education, but will also prevent us from having to outsource the job to other countries to provide often untested coding educational tools to us. This will save us money and produce value in our economy since the relationship will work the other way around. Although it is a good idea to provide free education the people who need it most (such as people in low-income situations inside and outside Canada), we can also create economic growth by selling to other wealthy nations. This will be a natural result of ubiquitous evidence based education which empowers all Canadians with the digital and entrepreneurial skills needed in the 21st century.

If ineffective coding education is provided to new students, they may fail to properly learn these digital technologies and simply assume that they are incapable of understanding core concepts in this area. When this happens, we lose another potential innovator and the person’s ability to create change in the world is significantly diminished. What we need is effective coding education that has been developed using the insights already available in our research sector.

Instead of simply throwing money at this problem, we should aim to create highly effective teams of educators who have extensive expertise in the areas of pedagogy, progressive educational technology and learning environments. These teams should be paired with our best technologists to create powerful educational platforms that meet a list of criteria for providing the most effective education possible. The technology should be low-cost, and evidence based. It should be a general solution, which allows our leading educators to easily insert their educational content to create courses and modules that can then undergo iterative improvement as they are utilized and tested among the population. After educators insert their educational content onto the platform, this content can be delivered to students with applications that leverage provide techniques and learning models, such as flipped classrooms or mastery learning models. For example, software that allows students to input data while watching videos (such as questions, confusion points, and notes) can assist in Flipped Classroom approaches. Software that breaks up learning modules into smaller parts with generated quizzes can assist in implementing Mastery Learning environments, or Adaptive Learning technologies. After the data is stored in the system, it can be output to the user in different ways because of the flexibility of software, and new technologies can be leveraged as time goes on with pre-existing educational data, possibly scanned in from raw written course material. In fact, it is almost impossible to predict all of the innovations in this area that Canadians will produce once they are given the skills and direction which is desperately needed.

Although the creation of a general purpose platform (which facilitates easy educational content creation) will be the most effective solution for tackling this issue, desperate short term measures are required. In my view, the most important things to develop first are the following:

  1. A set of online materials and courses which will educate Canadian teachers on evidence based educational technologies and learning environments. A condensed course containing the key educational concepts is also needed, which works will on mobile as well as PC platforms. This will allow our teachers to understand the basics of high quality education, and dispel harmful misconceptions that many teachers currently have (for example, teachers fear that these technologies aim to replace them, when in reality they are meant to empower and assist them, make them more effective at their jobs, and improve their experience teaching students). Of course, these materials can and should be available to all Canadians, as it is their right to understand effective education and what we know about it.
  2. A set of online materials and courses which can be used to effectively teach people basic coding and computation thinking. Again, these courses should be condensed to the core concepts and skills, and should focus on getting the student immediately engaged with the practice of solving problems and coding. Measures should be taken to ensure that these educational experiences are engaging and effective, to ensure that the majority of people can successfully obtain and retain the material. Active learning is extremely important in this area, which leads directly to project based learning (this is one of most effective ways to teach this subject: by having students work on creative projects that involve to their existing areas of interest or expertise, using coding as a tool to accomplish other goals). The content delivered can also be scaled up and down to be useful for elementary schools, high schools, post-secondary, retraining our workforce, as well as any Canadian with access to a mobile device or PC. Just like normal written language, coding and technology literacy can be applied to almost any discipline and is at the heart of innovation, giving citizens the tools to empower themselves, Canada, and ultimately the rest of the world.
  3. There are several other core areas that also need covered such as 21st century skills (including the four Cs), as well as environmental, world issues and personal health education. Basic reading, writing, mathematics and science are also desperately needed in the global community, as well as in a subset of our own population.
  4. Progressive educational policy to spur the development of these educational technologies, as well as their implementation in learning environments. Schools and teachers do not necessarily need to be required to implement the solutions supported by these policies. Instead, educational materials and applications that will educate them of these issues and technologies should be developed, tested and distributed. Incentives might be provided to teachers to accelerate widespread adoption. We should aim to create awareness of these issues and ideas, so that solutions can be developed sooner and more effectively. This is probably a better approach than enforcing solutions onto teachers (even though many are already evidence based), which could cause a negative reaction. If students are informed on these issues as well (based on clear direction proposed by the Canadian government) they will naturally seek the highest quality education available to them. Currently, students are mostly uninformed on these issues, and are usually only seeking to be awarded the best resume qualifications for a high job status. Instead, they could be focusing on finding the right learning environments that will allow them to develop and cultivate useful skills that enable them to provide value for themselves and society. From that foundation, Canadians will be able to pursue their interests more often based on the abundance created by a more digitally progressive society.

 

 

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National youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship celebration event

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 30 juin 2016 1467314950
Mots clés:
Canadian high school students regularly achieve world-class results in international STEM competitions. In 2015 – and again in 2016 – youn .... Lire la suite

Canadian high school students regularly achieve world-class results in international STEM competitions. In 2015 – and again in 2016 – young Canadians won the top award (and the US$75,000 cash prize) at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), topping 1,700 students from 75 countries. Canadians have won the Sanofi International Biogenius Challenge, FIRST Robotics Competition World Championships, and numerous STEM Olympiad competitions from astronomy to mathematics. Canadians have been top 15 finalists (from over 10,000 global entries) in the Google Science Fair almost every year since it began in 2011 – and won top awards in 2013 and 2014.

Most Canadians – and particularly our youth – are completely unaware. It’s as if our world junior hockey team won and no-one noticed. That doesn’t happen because Canada has a vibrant hockey culture. Thanks to Vancouver 2010 and Own the Podium, we’re developing an Olympic culture. But we need a STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship culture.

As in sports, a STEM culture needs heroes – rising stars that young Canadians recognize and emulate. When 16-year-old Victoria BC inventor Ann Makosinski appeared on the Jimmy Fallon Show with her hand-heat-powered flashlight – and again a year later with a cell phone charging travel mug – kids noticed. Peltier tile-powered devices – many built by girls – appeared at science fairs across Canada. Building a science and innovation culture is no different to building a hockey or Olympic culture; celebrating excellence and achievement on the national stage and in the media is an essential component.

In 2010, U.S. President Obama initiated what became an annual tradition – the White House Science Fair. Over the past six years, this event has celebrated the winners of a broad range of youth STEM and entrepreneurship competitions at what the President has called, “the most fun day of the year.”

I propose creating an annual event, hosted on Parliament Hill, to recognize Canadian winners of national and international youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship competitions and other young Canadian achievers. They would be invited to share their work with the Prime Minister / Minister of Youth, Minister of Science, Key Opinion Leaders, STEM-related government officials, and most importantly, the media.

Most kids aren’t going to become professional or Olympic athletes, but wanting to inspires and motivates. Let’s celebrate Canada’s youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship heroes and role models.

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Create small business grants to foster Canadian innovation

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 23 juin 2016 1466682464
Mots clés:
The NIH in the US has a SBIR (small business innovation research) grant program that aids enormously in getting new startup companies going.  It is a .... Lire la suite

The NIH in the US has a SBIR (small business innovation research) grant program that aids enormously in getting new startup companies going.  It is a highly used and integral part of the business environment in the US that is completely lacking in Canada.  We should consider adopting this strategy to allow Canadian small business ideas to be developed at home.

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Bubble-up Fermentation, Not Cream-Skimming

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 23 juin 2016 1466706094
Mots clés:
Too often supporting entrepreneurs is done through an incubation process that involves a committee that selects 'promising' projects from a field of c .... Lire la suite

Too often supporting entrepreneurs is done through an incubation process that involves a committee that selects 'promising' projects from a field of contenders. The statistics on such incubation approaches is clear - the results are poor, with very few succeeding beyond the support period, and fewer still still functioning after two years. 

This 'cream-skimming' approach is inferior to a bubble-up approach. This would entail a low-bar of acceptance into a 'co-working + resources' environment, where all have access to support, coaching and basic infrastructure. From this environment, the 'experts' can be as out of the way or as helping as needed. Strong entities will survive on their own merits, rather than weak entities with good schmooze-skills being propped up in a traditional incubator.

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Include Social Purchasing Values in all government procurement and infrastructure

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 24 juillet 2016 1469372797
Mots clés:
Every purchase has an economic, social and environmental ripple effect! Insuring best value in purchasing means considering  the full cost and true i .... Lire la suite

Every purchase has an economic, social and environmental ripple effect! Insuring best value in purchasing means considering  the full cost and true impact created when government spends tax payer money on goods and services and infrastructure. Adding a social value into the mix of price, quality and environment will enhance the demand for social enterprise goods and services. A requirement for social value consideration in purchasing will lead private sector government contractors to implement stronger social values into their bids, often opening up sub-contract opportunities for social enterprises. See www.buysocialcanada.ca

 

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UNLEASH THE FULL POTENTIAL OF WOMEN INNOVATORS ALONG WITH OTHER MARGINALIZED GROUPS

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 17 août 2016 1471476711
Mots clés:
Canada's innovation policy has marginalized women and other groups.  The evidence and statistics which point to this are much publicized. From the am .... Lire la suite

Canada's innovation policy has marginalized women and other groups.  The evidence and statistics which point to this are much publicized. From the amount of VC capital going to women led ventures, to the number of female partners in VC funds, the issue is clearly documented. 

If we still need convincing, let's look at the participation rates of women in Ontario's government funded incubators and accelerators (4-20%). Award winning incubator programs like Ryerson's DMZ notes 15-20% at best. 

The new Communitech Fierce Founder program, which originally was designed for women founders, later changed from a female founder only stance to a "must have female in C-suite). This is a significant change and unfortunate one. As someone who works in the start up space, I see a tremendous difference in progress, resilience and motivation when one is in an environment where you can be your authentic self. Co-ed environments are important too. But we should not under-value the role of women led/women only--or other culturally specific spaces --in the advancement of innovation in Canada.

At a Conference in March, 2016, Dr. Ilse Tueurnicht said (Quote).

 

"The biggest lift we can get in this {innovation} business is by involving women more. And it doesn't matter where you sit on the continuum of innovation, whether you are up in our building (MaRS) or in start ups, or in tech corporations, or in venture capital, across the continuum, women remain hugely under-represented.  And at this stage in my career, I am sad to say that I am more worried about this topic over the past two years than I have been for a long, long time. So there is a lot of work to do ,for all of us to do".

 

Dr. Treurnicht is right. And as we have watched this new innovation agenda consultation process and road show unfold, we have heard nary a word about the importance of increasing women's participation, despite the fact that the Minister's mandate expressly states that the pursuit of gender parity in this space is a priority.

 

What we would like to see is:

 

1) A serious effort to change the culture of the innovation space. Culture at the moment has a male and dominant culture bias that shuts out  talented female/other marginalized would be innovators .  Culture changers could include offering day care /elder care services to women (and yes, all) entrepreneurs and innovators, arranging meetings and presentations before 3:30 and after 9am (as many parents have to leave to drop off and pick up their kids), prayer space, inclusive social activities and the like.   When it comes to women in particular, the reality is, the bulk of care work still falls to women, and by making it difficult for the to participate given their other responsibilities, we are leaving money and talent on the table.

 

  1. Make sure VC funds that receive government matching dollars for investment can demonstrate gender parity in their partner ranks and management teams before being eligible for public money.

 

  1. Consider funding demographic incubators (there are over 25 women founder incubators in the US and it is a growing segment. There are also more and more by/for black, hispanic and other demographically focused support for innovation and entrepreneurship.). Yet in Ontario, there is no women led/women focused incubator or accelerator program. There are also no indigenous focused programs or spaces where one can feel culturally at home. This means women (and other members of marginalized groups) who are talented choose to set their ideas aside because they do not thrive in melting pot mainstream environments.  We also need consider the concept of laddering.  Sometimes we hear people saying this is anti-diversity, but we know this is an ignorant response--not dissimilar to responding to BLM with #allivesmatter. 

 

4)  The focus on youth to the exclusion of much else is misguided.  Evidence shows that innovators over 40 are highly skilled and much more productive due to their higher and broader business skill levels.  Yet support for entrepreneurs in that age bracket is limited. While one might argue the tent is open to anyone, we know that the youth culture propagated at many of our innovation support programs means those over 40 feel unwelcome. The programming incubators is also heavily geared to those who need entry level business skills. Older innovators need different supports.  We are squandering one of our best resources---the 40-70 age group, ignoring their potential, and by not supporting them in a relevant way they need to be supported when they get there.

 

Please consider broadening the innovation program to be more authentically inclusive. If innovation is a numbers game, we are not going to win as a nation by narrowing our effort to a policy and program with fits just the few.

 Back to the question--Imagine if Canada became know as THE Best country for women innovators and entrepreneurs, plus the BEST country for newcomer innovators because we have a mosaic approach to innovation, and not a melting pot.

Mentions de sources: Valerie Fox, Vicki Saunders, Barbara Orser, Catherine Elliot and many others.

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Improve Access to Business Development Programs for Co-operatives and Non-profits

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 24 août 2016 1472057770
Mots clés:
Expand the capacity and access to existing small and medium enterprise services through the Canadian Business Network and other federal business devel .... Lire la suite

Expand the capacity and access to existing small and medium enterprise services through the Canadian Business Network and other federal business development programs to enhance business supports and readiness for investment by social enterprises and co-operatives.

Mentions de sources: Canadian CED Network, Social Enterprise Council of Canada, Co-operatives and Mutuals Canada, Chantie

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Decrease Immigration, Foreign Workers and Foreign Students

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 30 septembre 2016 1475257434
Mots clés:
The best thing we can do to ensure opportunities for Canadians and developing talent is prioritizing Canadians over foreigners when it comes to work o .... Lire la suite

The best thing we can do to ensure opportunities for Canadians and developing talent is prioritizing Canadians over foreigners when it comes to work opportunities, internships, education, government programs and resources. We need to substantially decrease immigration, temporary foreign workers, internal mobility program workers, and decrease foreign students.

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Economic advancement of less than middle class

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 22 juin 2016 1466609067
Mots clés:
Our banking system is geared too much towards graduated benefits to the already arrived and not enough for those struggling to get ahead. We're fallin .... Lire la suite

Our banking system is geared too much towards graduated benefits to the already arrived and not enough for those struggling to get ahead. We're falling behind in each generation to economic disparity. Buying a house requires more capital, education no longer affordable but being used as a means to capture market of young people indebted to costly loan mechanisms. Take actions which profit younger people who have fewer assets by universal child care affordable, free university, Canada Post banking. 

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Encourage Social Innovation in Business

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 24 juillet 2016 1469378394
Mots clés:
The Federal Government can develop policies, incentives and programs in collaboration with industry / business / trade associations and civil society .... Lire la suite

The Federal Government can develop policies, incentives and programs in collaboration with industry / business / trade associations and civil society to encourage business and industry sectors to advance social innovation in business.  The government can use its procurement to encourage and engage its suppliers in pursuing social value through their businesses, rewarding those suppliers which excel in social value creation. The government can also require all recipients of any public funding (including grants) to demonstrate their social contributions and impacts. The government can build upon and promote this guide to corporate social innovation: http://corostrandberg.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/social-value-business-guide-corporate-social-innovation.pdf  

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Develop Talent Instead of Attracting Talent

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 24 juillet 2016 1469398680
Mots clés:
The objective of this new government should absolutely be development of talent already available in Canada so that we the urgent and pervasive proble .... Lire la suite

The objective of this new government should absolutely be development of talent already available in Canada so that we the urgent and pervasive problems of underemployment(thus lack of family formation) and household debts are addressed. The government should conversely increase conditions on employers for attracting talent from abroad to decrease its use. Employers need to offer training on their own or in collaboration with the education sector or others.

Developing and attracting are different things, confusingly or intentionally globbed into one question here. Some would say the more you attract talent, the less incentive there is to develop talent, that there is an inverse relationship between the two. Attracting more talent doesn't mean more employment for Canadians; on the contrary it lowers employment opportunities for Canadians already available. Unemployment is currently over 6% when it should be closer to 3%, precisely because what we have been doing is wrongfully attracting talent instead of developing talent. Developing means more employment for Canadians. Our immigration rates are double what they are in the US and Temporary Foreign Worker rates more than doubled by the last government. we have been successfully attracting too much talent. Immigration levels should have been decreased upon the 2008 economic downturn but were not, creating a 400k-800k surplus of new Canadians. Instead of an immigration volume of 250k a year, but instead of 125k to put us inline with the US, since we already have a surplus and that we need to take serious action to develop Canadian talent, we should try to work with a volume 65k for the time being. That would help us focus on developing our talent, and get access to other talent in their locations abroad to then repatriate those skills and work back to Canadians.

Employers benefit from either of the two options, therefore developing talent is of course the preferred option for Canada and Canadians, over attracting talent. Employers without involvement in a good talent development process should be less likely permitted to bring in new talent from abroad, prioritizing foreigners over current Canadians should be much more greatly disincentivized.

We should also raise the minimum wage, and wages in general, talent needs to be duly rewarded. The old saying 'the customer is always right' doesn't apply anymore, the mantra and priority in this day-and-age is to first treat your people (employees) right/well.

Developing talent by hiring abroad and repatriating work to Canada. Is simply the opposite of what was done when jobs were outsourced from Canada. Collecting the skills from abroad instead of the people. China forces foreign companies to joint-venture with Chinese companies so that they can learn for free, and then they go develop the same business on their own, to compete with the foreign company they partnered with. When western tech companies are shipping operations to lower-cost countries, people from the lower cost countries come to North America to learn the business and then are sent back to the lower-cost jurisdiction, the work gets transferred. Now repatriating work is reversing that trend, for skilled work. Hire skilled people from anywhere in the world in their location abroad, and have them get Canadian co-workers up to speed on those skills. Simply by working as a cross-border team and or through a structured skills transfer process.

Also keep in mind, some demand for employees is temporary by international or US companies with offices in Canada, it is only because the company bid on a temporary project contract and won the business, and they are then wanting to find someone with a specific profile so they don't have to spend resources on training decreasing their profit margins on the project. That is not stable work for a Canadian let alone a foreign hire that could be brought in and then out of work in Canada after the project is up. Therefore potentially not only was a Canadian employee not used but now there is a foreign person or new Canadian out of work in Canada. Meanwhile the US or foreign company took the lions share of the benefits on the project, and if a Canadian employee wasn't hired, and then later a foreign hire brought in also looking for work, that's a triple loss for Canadians.

When it comes to employer training, companies in Canada are now one of the worst at providing training to employees. We should think about some system, maybe tax credit, legislating training as a requirement, a market based solution, a tax for those companies who don’t offer training, grants for business associations to offer training to companies at a reduced rate, or any number of methods. Whatever the specifics are one thing is clear, employers in Canada offer next to nothing when it comes to training or development, to their own detriment and to that of their employees, and that needs to change in a big way.

Along with dropping immigration levels to 50k, employers need to be required to provide training to employees. Laws are now needed to require responsible behavior by companies in training employees, as companies haven't been showing good behavior on their own, and they haven't been motivated by grant subsidies. If foreign project based companies leave, that's ok because they are net drain on Canada and not a net benefit, Canadian staff left behind can even incorporate an employee owned company. Employees need more representation in companies they work for and in government programs at all levels. 

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/topics/education/commentaries/16-02-02/what_canada_can_learn_about_higher_education_from_the_most_competitive_country_in_the_world.aspx

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/topics/education/commentaries/14-03-20/developing_skills_where_are_canada_s_employers.aspx

Just beware to carefully consider the details of their ideas, as the Conference Board of Canada may sometimes support international private sector interests at the expense of Canadians, it was after-all founded by the Conference Board in New York, a group of US corporate interests.

https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/the-truth-about-canada-some/9780771041662-item.html

https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/viking-economics-how-the-scandinavians/9781612195360-item.html

So when it comes to attracting talent, it is to capture the skills in their location abroad and then repatriate the skills and work back to Canadians, and avoid bringing in more people to compete with talent already available here, all Canadians looking for better jobs. And for the talent that is here, further developing that talent with the assistance of the private sector that needs the specific talent.

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Innovation is for all, not just some. Support grassroots innovation.

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 25 juillet 2016 1469478149
Mots clés:
Canada needs to support grassroots innovation. Innovation that occurs spontaneously outside the domain of academic institutions but instead occurs in .... Lire la suite

Canada needs to support grassroots innovation. Innovation that occurs spontaneously outside the domain of academic institutions but instead occurs in the basements, bedrooms and garages all across this country. 

There exists funding place for Campus Linked Accelerators (CLAs) such as UWaterloo Velocity Garage, Ryerson DMZ as examples. This is all well and good but what about the 30 or 40 something year old folks that have ideas and want to innovate? Where do they go? Why can't they get the same support via an environment where they can develop ideas and be innovate. 

Makerspaces and collaborative spaces are part of the answer to this problem enabling anyone with an idea to develop that idea in a low cost manner using the latest in digital fabrication equipment and tools to do so...and to have a community to access as well. These spaces are starting to take root in communities across Canada, but what they need more of is funding and support from the government. We all can be innovative and creative beings, we just need the environment to do so.

The next big idea is in the head of a 15 year old...or a 55 year old. What they need is a place to develop it. Government of Canada, step up and support makerspaces, collaborative space, innovation hubs or whatever they may be called. Canada doesn't lack for innovation, what we lack are accessible places for ANYONE to be innovative. 

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National Youth Science and Innovation Network

Question:Comment aider nos jeunes à acquérir les compétences requises au sein de l’économie de demain?
en 27 juillet 2016 1469642783
Mots clés:
Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science. Canada's response to the technologica .... Lire la suite

Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science.

Canada's response to the technological and space race in the 1960s was the development of local, regional and national opportunities to foster and showcase the innovativeness of youth in science - science fairs. Over five decades, this network - primarily driven by volunteers and teachers - has helped develop some of Canada's (and the world's) leaders in business, research, science and social impact. From Roberta Bondar to Michael Serbinis to Marc Kielburger to Raymond Wang, science fairs have helped shape the impact Canada has on the world.

Investing in a proven program that encourages youth from curiosity through to discovery will ensure Canada's success in innovation, skills development and will creates the nation's future economic leaders.

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Don’t forget those who aren’t in high tech.

Question:Comment le Canada peut-il devenir le pays le mieux placé pour attirer et former des gens talentueux?
en 16 août 2016 1471378104
Mots clés:
"Our fear is that when we talk about innovation we think about the heavy R&D, guys-in-white-lab-coat type of stuff, which, by default, excludes a sign .... Lire la suite

"Our fear is that when we talk about innovation we think about the heavy R&D, guys-in-white-lab-coat type of stuff, which, by default, excludes a significant part of the business population,"

"Our general advice is not to forget the 60-70 per cent of the business population that is not in high tech."

Louis-Martin Parent, director, president's office at the Canadian Federation of Independent Businesses, The events that led to the invention of a wireless, waterproof heart monitor, GlobeandMail.com, July 28 2016

Mentions de sources: Louis-Martin Parent, director, president's office at the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

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Create opportunities for multi-sectoral collaboration

Question:Quoi faire de plus pour consolider le rôle du Canada comme chef de file de l’entrepreneuriat social?
en 19 août 2016 1471645425
Mots clés:
Social entrepreneurs approaches complex challenges by bringing all the tools of all sectors to play on the challenge. This is different from social en .... Lire la suite

Social entrepreneurs approaches complex challenges by bringing all the tools of all sectors to play on the challenge. This is different from social enterprise wherein it is mostly about NFP organization generating income to better meet their mandate (the UK is a leader in this space) or social purpose business like B Corps using a business first approach to develop socially or environmentally appropriate products and services (the US is a leader here). Canada can lead by creating opportunities for multi-sectoral engagement that allows different groups to come together to redefine and ultimately solve our complex challenges. This includes the work of places like the MaRS Solutions Lab; the creation of a pro bono marketplace being led by the McConnell Foundation, MaRS and Aimia; Studio Y; and the work of the Centre for Impact Investing to help fund this approach using the innovation tools of social finance. Let's hold a competition to determine which big challenge to address and then focus all we have to solve it by using our neutral spaces for cross sectoral collaboration facilitated by design and systems thinking. 

Mentions de sources: JW McConnell Family Foundation; MaRS Discovery District; Social Innovation Generation (SIG)

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